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InnoGames boasts 100% mobile revenue boost

first_imgInnoGames boasts 100% mobile revenue boostAlso sees €100m in revenue in 2015Rachel WeberSenior EditorThursday 18th February 2016Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleInnoGamesInnoGames achieved a revenue of revenue of €100 million in 2015, a 25 per cent growth on the previous year. It also revealed that on the mobile side of its business it had achieved a growth of 100 per cent thanks to Forge Of Empires.”Thanks to the high quality of Forge of Empires’ cross platform approach, 60 per cent of the game’s players are now using the mobile apps,” said CEO Hendrik Klindworth.”And although InnoGames plans to further focus on mobile in 2016, we do still see a great demand for browser games as well. In fact, our successful launch of the browser title Elvenar in 2015, along with having another profitable year for our older browser titles Tribal Wars and Grepolis, proves that the platform is still popular.”InnoGames has around 150 million registered players globally. Earlier this month it appointed a new director of human resources.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “The significant increase in sales and our once again profitable balance sheet show that we are moving in the right direction with our mobile strategy,” added CFO Markus Lipp. “We have several mobile titles in development, and are convinced that 2016 will be another highly profitable year in the books.”InnoGames also released a short video featuring comments from Klindworth and it can be viewed below. Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesMTG increases investment in InnoGames, forms new holding companyGamingCo will include MTG’s entire gaming business, including KongregateBy Rebekah Valentine 5 months agoForge of Empires reaches €500m in lifetime revenueInnoGames’ strategy title brought in over €250m in the last two yearsBy Rebekah Valentine A year agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Naughty Dog condemns abusive fan response to The Last of Us 2

first_imgNaughty Dog condemns abusive fan response to The Last of Us 2Creative director Neil Druckman and voice actor Laura Bailey receive death threats and abuse over game’s narrative decisionsHaydn TaylorSenior Staff WriterMonday 6th July 2020Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleNaughty DogNaughty Dog has condemned the toxic fan backlash which continues to dominate discourse around The Last of Us Part 2. Despite a strong critical reception and early sales figures, a small but loud minority of consumers have taken to hurling abuse at both creative director Neil Druckman and voice actor Laura Bailey. Abuse directed at Druckman and Bailey includes death threats, antisemitism, misogyny, and transphobia. “I hope these gamers get the mental help they so clearly need,” said Druckman on Twitter. “Unfortunately this is now the cost of making popular entertainment that challenges conventions. Laura doesn’t deserve any of this.”Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Bailey, who voices the character of Abby, described the torrent of online abuse as “a little overwhelming.” “Although we welcome critical discussion, we condemn any form of harassment or threats directed towards our team and cast,” said Naughty in a statement on Twitter. “Their safety is our top priority, but we must all work together to root out this type of behavior and maintain a constructive and compassionate discourse.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesThe Last of US Part 2 secures a record 13 BAFTA nominationsNaughty Dog’s game leads a big haul for Sony, with PlayStation exclusives accounting for 41 nominations overallBy Matthew Handrahan 2 months agoThe Last of Us Part 2 | Games of the Year 2020Naughty Dog delivered a powerful and introspective story of revenge, obsession and self-destructionBy Marie Dealessandri 4 months agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

World’s biggest solar + storage projects planned for Australia

first_imgWorld’s biggest solar + storage projects planned for AustraliaAustralian infrastructure investor Lyon Group says it plans to build the world’s biggest solar plus storage project in South Australia in the next two years, and sees a huge future for combined solar and battery storage plants. July 19, 2016 pv magazine Energy Storage Installations Markets Markets & Policy Share Lyon Group’s David Green – which worked on developing a soon-to-be built 30MW solar plant and 1.4MW/5.3MWh lithium battery storage facility near Cooktown, in far north Queensland, before selling it to German-based company Conergy – plans a series of other projects and claims a pipeline of more than 300MW of solar and up to 60MW of battery storage.The first new project is planned for South Australia, with a 100MW solar PV plant to be combined with a battery storage array of up to 40MW, Green says the plant could be in operation near Roxby Downs by early 2018, and there are plans for other similar projects around the country.The first stage of what is known as the Kingfisher project – 20MW of solar PV plus a minimum 2MW battery storage – is expected to be running late next year. The project is one of the finalists in the Australian Renewable Energy Agency funding round for large scale solar, which is expected to allocate monies to 10 or more projects when decisions are announced next month. Green says the company – which has previously invested in coal, gas and wind projects, but is now specialising in solar and storage – is looking to be a global industry leader in solar plus storage. “The genie is out of the bottle. There will be a burst of activity now in large scale solar + battery projects. This is the real battery storage story coming out of Australia – batteries used to convert large scale solar to effectively baseload, or peaking plant.” The combination of solar and storage means the facilities can compete on two levels – providing clean energy and dispatchable power, either to household or large energy users, and also re-enforcing the edge the grid, in some cases avoiding the costs of grid upgrades. “The battery component of these projects provides greater energy security and energy quality, load shifting and management of ramp rates which is critical for major energy users with large swing loads,” Green says. “So our pipeline initially focuses on regional, high energy use areas on the fringe of the electricity grid but is rapidly expanding into other areas.” Lyon says that battery storage costs are falling fast – the cost of storage had fallen 60 per cent in the last two years as the company put together the Cooktown project, and further falls are expected, particularly in grid level storage. Because of this, the combination of solar and storage is now becoming competitive with the wider grid, particularly when network benefits are taken into account. He says corporate interest is keen, although many are wary about the risks of new technology. “Investor pressures and economics are lining up and Lyon is working with a number of large resource companies with fringe of grid operations and large loads,” he says. “The economics of the projects is enhanced as the combination of large scale battery with the solar plant allows for higher value capture from shifting power output from the solar plant to higher price periods in the market.” The Kingfisher project is one of a number of large scale solar projects being proposed for South Australia, particularly since the closure of the Northern brown coal power station. Several, including a 110MW solar tower power plant, will offer storage, a growing need in a state now sourcing nearly half of its electricity from wind and solar. The idea for Kingfisher is to connect into the NEM at Roxby Downs, into a line that links with working mine sites, including Olympic Dam. Green says the South Australian market is attractive because of its excellent solar resources, its high “base load” power prices, and it could also avoid costly upgrades of networks at the fringe of grid. “South Australia needs an answer to its renewable energy challenges and we think our Kingfisher project is a big part of the energy solution for that state.” Green says providing reliable electricity to these areas has traditionally meant massive investment in extremely long network lines which is costly and also inefficient because of the huge energy loss and loss of energy quality you get transporting electricity across those distances. Green says one of the biggest challenges to the technology is to overcome perceived risks. “There is a lot of negative comment about renewables connected to the grid. What we looking to do with these projects is to demonstrate that some of those comments being made are not valid. We want to demonstrate that those perceived risks are not risks. They are readily mitigated and should be an impediment to deployment at all.” This article was republished with permission. The original article can be found here.This content is protected by copyright and may not be reused. If you want to cooperate with us and would like to reuse some of our content, please contact: [email protected] content ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… 123456iAbout these recommendationsShare pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. Battery testing builds certainty Michael Kleinberg 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. No bifacial solar in West Africa? That’s likely to change soon Cosmas Mwirigi 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A technology-focused event held by the Africa Solar Industry Association has heard development pipelines across the cont… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Orig… US start-up secures distribution agreement for nickel-hydrogen battery technology Emiliano Bellini 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com EnerVenue signed its first major distribution agreement with Hong Kong’s Towngas. The deal will pilot the company’s nick… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The s… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Grid code compliance in megawatt projects 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsEhsan Nadeem Khan, Grid Code Compliance Engineer, meteocontrolModeratorsMarian Willuhn, Editor… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Time to standardize pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Not all quality control plans, processes and agreements are created equal, writes Frédéric Dross, the VP of strategic de… 10 GW is just the beginning Blake Matich 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Giant PV and wind projects are taking shape in Australia’s north, with the aim of supplying Asia with the clean energy i… Unchained: political moves shift solar supply David Wagman 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com PV module supply chains to the U.S. industry are in flux, and not for the first time. Moves to take action alongside sti… When quality meets quantity Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As 2021 progresses, the signs of it being (yet another) banner year for PV deployment become clearer. An increasing numb… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… Microcracks and module design pv magazine 8 April 2021 pv-magazine.com New cell and module technologies are boosting power outputs, but they often have implications for quality. A focus purel… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Lincoln’s great america is suffering : Black History of Racism In America

The crisis has deepened due to the rebellion caused by racial death in America, who is already struggling with over one lakh deaths due to epidemic corona.George Floyd, a black American citizen who came to Minneapolis from Texas to search for a better life in Minneapolis, was caught attempting to run counterfeit dollars. A nine-minute video made by a walking man shows Derek Chauvin, a Minneapolis policeman, holding George Floyd’s neck with his knees and George Floyd telling police personnel around him That he is having difficulty breathing. Since his death, protests against this death in police custody have spread throughout the US and now the protest has taken a violent form.This protest is not happening due to the incident which happened only one day, its spark has been burning in America for many years. On 4 July 1776, America gained independence. But the black slaves brought from Africa were not freed from slavery. They used to do all the household work, blacks were also employed in farming and their physical exploitation was common. After independence, there was talk of giving them rights, but there was a difference of opinion between North and South America. To reduce the growing resentment of the southern states, the Fugitive Slave Act was introduced in the year 1850 in which blacks who fled from the owner could be captured and brought back. These differences between the North and South states led to a civil war between 1861–1865. Abraham Lincoln ended all these differences and brought an end to the civil war after the liberation proclamation.A hundred years after that, there was no significant improvement in the condition of blacks in American society and neither did they get equal rights as whites, as a result of this, African American Civil Rights Movement led by Martin Luther King in America from 1955-68. Amidst this movement, Martin Luther King, in a speech given in 1963, said that even today, a hundred years after the proclamation of the liberation proclamation, the black American finds himself deported in his country and is rotting in the corners of society. He had said that I have a dream that America of the future should be such that my children are identified by their work and character, not by their colour.Even then, the Chicago riots occurred in 1919, in 1992 the Lance Angeles riots stained America. A similar video surfaced in July 2014, when Eric Garner, a black father in New York, was similarly killed by police. In 2014 itself, a twelve-year-old child Tamir Rice was shot dead by police personnel in Cleveland, Ohio on the information that he was carrying a pistol, leading to his death. The investigation found that the pistol was fake with the child. On 23 February this year, a white American father-son, who was jogging a black American named Ahmed Arbari, was shot dead by a white father-son duo.According to a survey conducted by the American newspaper “The Guardian”, in the US, 7.13 people per million killed by the police are black, and the number of whites killed is 2.91. A thousand peoples in a year are killed by the police in America.When Barack Obama became the first black president of the United States, it seemed that the racially discriminated America was left behind, but the situation got worse after Trump became the US president. Trump has a connection with racial discrimination.In 1973, Trump was accused of renting his flats on the basis of colour. They flatly refused to rent their flats to blacks.In 1980, Kip Brown, an old Trump building employee, accused Trump of asking blacks to leave when Trump came to the casino.In 2016, Trump made a statement on the five black citizens who were freed after being sentenced for rape in 1989, saying they still believe the five were guilty. Trump criminalized Mexican immigrants in 2015, Said, rapist and drug dealer.In 2016, he called blacks living in poverty. Trump has always been an opponent of Obama.Minneapolis police welcomed him to Trump’s rally last year by wearing a t-shirt with the slogan ‘Cops for Trump’. In the midst of these protests against racial discrimination, Trump has tweeted and called these protesters thugs (bandits, criminals).Which Twitter has called the tweet provoking violence. The protest in front of the White House was so rampant that Trump was taken to a bunker for security reasons and has threatened to bring down troops to the cities to deal with the demonstration.It remains to be seen whether these performances after the death of George Floyd will be able to bring some change in future America. In order to maintain the image of the world superpower already broken by Corona, America will have to break this tilism of white black and start looking at every citizen with the same vision.Martin Luther King saw the free American notion of white-black, that would only be possible. read more

Jean-Luc Le Gall extends contract with Selestat until 2015

first_imgClick to comment ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsJean-Luc Le Gall and Selestat have agreed an extention of the contract with the coach. He joined the club in 2008, and with the successful work done in the past few seasons, have made the Selestians pleased and offered him extension until 2015, which was accepted by the coach. The contract is to end June 2015.  This comes at time when the club recently also agreed prolongation of contract with players like Fulop, Podsiadlo, Petrenko, Freppel and François-Mari. ShareTweetShareShareEmail Related Items: Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

In defense of the Walloons

first_imgIntellectually, Magnette can probably see that CETA, once the text is cleaned up, is not the bogeyman that some claim. He certainly knows that greater transatlantic trade is in Wallonia’s economic interest and that it would be a mistake for Wallonia to portray itself internationally as anti-business. But politically, he knows that it would be damaging for his party to fall into line with a right-wing federal government. He has an invidious choice to make between looking after the interests of his party and protecting the image of his region and country.As for the image of the European Union, that, too, is under threat, but much of the fault lies with Belgium.Tim King writes POLITICO‘s Brussels Sketch. Also On POLITICO Defiant Wallonia rejects deadline to save EU-Canada deal By Hans von der Burchard and Christian Oliver In the European Union, size doesn’t always matter. A country’s power and influence are not measured simply in terms of the number of its citizens. The small and the outnumbered can still wield power. The current brouhaha over Belgium’s failure to sign up to a free-trade deal between the EU and Canada is a reminder of that reality.Or, as Carl Bildt, sometime prime minister and more recently foreign minister of Sweden, tweeted this week, “A minority in Belgium want to block the rest of Europe.”Those who have criticized the Walloon parliament, the legislature of the southern francophone half of the country, have made much of it representing a population of only 3.6 million, out of the EU’s total population of 510 million. (The total population of Belgium is 11.2m, with 6.4m in Dutch-speaking Flanders and 1.2m in the bilingual region of Brussels.) But by the standards of the atomized EU, 3.6 million is actually quite a lot: more than the population of six member states of the EU, Luxembourg, Malta, Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia and Slovenia. But back then the focus of the EU’s trade policy was to pursue multilateral trade agreements. It was only after the slow death of the Doha Round that the EU turned its intention to seeking bilateral trade deals, with the likes of South Korea, India, Canada and the U.S. It did so in an environment in which popular suspicion of trade deals meant member states were more careful about the negotiating mandates that they gave to the Commission. The regions found that their powers over international agreements were of greater importance than before the millennium.A legacy of that era was that the EU was now a target of popular protest. Violent demonstrations in Seattle against the Millennium Round (Doha’s predecessor) found an echo in the European Council at Gothenburg of June 2001 and the accompanying EU-U.S. summit. More damaging were the non-violent campaigns to stop the EU concluding other forms of international agreements: against the copyrighting of computer-related inventions (software patents); against the anti-counterfeiting trade agreement; against GM crops and foods. In turn, those successes fed into the persistent opposition to TTIP, the EU-U.S. trade negotiations with which CETA has, rightly or wrongly, become associated. And it is surely no coincidence that opposition to GMs and TTIP became routine articles of faith in francophone socialism — Walloon socialism has taken its cue from the French Left.On bended kneeTo that changed context must be added developments inside Belgium. Since the autumn of 2014, Belgium has been ruled at the federal level by an asymmetric coalition. Traditionally, there was a line of symmetry along the linguistic divide, with two (sometimes three) parties from each side. But the government put together two years ago is composed of three Flemish parties and only one francophone party — the liberal party from which Prime Minister Charles Michel hails. That has consequences elsewhere. The Flemish regional government is an alliance of the same three Flemish parties — N-VA, CD&V and Open-VLD. The Walloon regional government, however, is a coalition of the Parti Socialiste and CdH (a descendant of the francophone Christian Democrats), with Michel’s francophone liberals in opposition.On top of that changed context, add some unfortunate timing. Only this week, Michel’s federal government pushed through a contentious budget which makes painful choices about welfare, unemployment benefit and the like. At the federal level, the socialists are powerless to stop the government’s plans: The government won a vote of confidence. However, at the regional level, in Wallonia, PS and CdH can at least vent their frustration. More than that, the Walloon government would suffer a backlash from its supporters if it is seen to be bending the knee to a federal government that has just issued a budget which the trade unions will be protesting about in the streets of Brussels in the coming weeks. It cannot help that Didier Reynders, who as foreign minister is supposed to put Belgium’s name to the CETA deal is, like Michel, a francophone liberal — so another arch-enemy of PS and CdH.Belgium’s Prime minister Charles Michel gestures to journalists as he arrives before an EU summit meeting on June 28, 2016 at the European Union headquarters in Brussels | Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty ImagesHere another circumstance comes into play. In Belgium as in other parts of Europe, the Greens and far-left have harnessed doubts about globalization and multinational corporations to recruit supporters and votes. And recent opinion polls in Belgium show the Greens and the far-left parties making advances, apparently at the expense of the soft-left of the PS, its Flemish counter-part, and CdH. So from both left and right, the parties of the Walloon government are squeezed.Paul Magnette, the politics professor turned politician who leads the Walloon government, is now in a very difficult position. Instinctively, like most Belgians, he will hate the idea of Belgium being out on a limb. Belgium, unlike some other countries, is not comfortable when isolated in foreign affairs. This episode brings to mind unfortunate echoes of Belgium’s genocide law and the possible application of universal jurisdiction — which meant people could be pursued through Belgium courts for alleged crimes committed anywhere in the world — a law that was a public relations disaster at a time when Louis Michel, Charles’s father, was foreign minister. (Eventually, Belgium repealed universal jurisdiction and a court ruled it could not be applied to serving heads of government.)center_img And the EU is accustomed to paying scrupulous attention to those that are outnumbered. In its institutional structures, the EU has long been careful to balance the interests of small states and minorities against large states and the tyranny of majorities. In the Council of Ministers and the European Parliament, the smaller member states have representation and powers that are proportionately greater than their population numbers might warrant.What makes the obstruction that currently lies in the path of the EU-Canada trade deal so unusual is not, therefore, the opposition or discontent of a minority. The fault lies rather with Belgium’s flawed political structure and its latent incompatibility with EU membership.To simplify slightly, in Belgium the devolution of power to the regions has gone so far that the federal government has no mechanism for resolving certain differences between regions, nor between federal and regional levelsTo simplify slightly, in Belgium the devolution of power to the regions has gone so far that the federal government has no mechanism for resolving certain differences between regions, nor between federal and regional levels. In those circumstances, Belgium cannot deliver on the undertakings it makes in the EU’s Council of Ministers. Other countries, most frequently Sweden and Denmark, attach caveats to their consent to Council decisions — ‘subject to parliamentary approval’ — but such promises are usually made by governments with parliamentary majorities. In Belgium, with separate political parties on each side of the linguistic divide, the odds are stacked against the federal government being able to command the support of all the regions.That Belgian fault-line has long been there — at least since the regions were given a say on international agreements in a wave of devolution in 1993. It was widened by subsequent bouts of devolution that handed over even more areas of policymaking to the regions. But the faultline would not necessarily have been exposed to the world had it not been for a succession of changes in the political context — some external, others peculiar to Belgium.The most important external change was the character of international trade negotiations. Until fairly recently, trade negotiations and the policing of international trade agreements were matters for the European Commission, which had competence on behalf of the EU’s member states. For Belgium’s regions, responsibility for trade meant trade promotion — marketing the region’s companies and products, trying to attract foreign direct investment. The Flemish region set up its own trade embassies in New York and London. The Walloon region too, though economically more troubled, pursued a policy of trying to attract foreign investment with various forms of sweeteners.last_img read more

Phish’s Mike Gordon Shares Two Strange New Recipes

first_imgCook with Mike! Phish bassist Mike Gordon shared two humorous recipes on his official website earlier, and they are, like the man itself, kind of out there. The first is for a Thai sauce, ‘Peanut Grigio’, while the second is for a corn dish that include spiderwebs – ‘Corn on The Cobwebs’. The ingredients for both are 7 eggs and a pound of cumin.1) PEANUT GRIGIOIngredients:Eggs 7Cumin 1lb.This is a chance to get wine into a Thai sauce. Don’t use table wine unless it’s Proctor and Gamble. Use couch wine, or maybe even ottoman wine, like Hasbro. Hasbro now has a sulfide free red wine made from grapes that were needle punctured. Yay that shit. Okay, get one (1) lb. of Thai food from a mediocre to lower-great restaurant. Wash the marinade off they might have “tried.” I think you’re gonna wanna cook the peanuts first. Probably, I’d say, get ‘em in the microwave for half an hour on 350. Rotate. A little more. Now smash em up and mix em with the Hasbro. Voila! That’s how the French say, “Check this shit out.” Oh.. oops… also add tumeric, Himallayan C-section salt, and a dash of brewer’s yeast. Ok, you’re off! Remember when serving this one, that if a coupla guys are on one side of the table, and, let’s say, a guy and a dame on the other side, that the dame gets served first, but you’re still gonna wanna symetrify the portions.1) CORN ON THE COBWEBIngredients:Eggs 7Cumin 1lb.Okay, it seems gross, but everyone in “culinary” knows that spider webs are so rich in basic vitamins and amino acids (not so in nitrates – ha ha ha ha ha ha). Even bugs ‘emselves are disgustingly beneficial to our systems, so this is a way to get that bug energy in the system without gettin’ weird. Okay grab the cobs, but this time we’re taking the corn off and we’re dealing with the “host dowell” (as beknownst to besaid). You’re gonna have to navigate that cob in a way that aint gonna break the web, so my good man, twist delicately and twist evenly and get that web on there as a sheath. Even is the key word here. You gotta line up the rows with the rows. Know I’m sayin’? Then comes in your balsamic reduction, and right out it goes, out the back patio! We don’t need it. Okay, so all you would like to take your umagoshi plum and smear on the corn and web (you can use em without webs instead of butter on a snowy day) but don’t break or malallign the web. This isn’t gonna heat well in the microwave, so in the summer you can put it on a back portch or roof tile (read: shingle) and let it singe. I mean we want it to fry out there, with directy yuminess right from the sun. Serve these with Splenda packets all around the host dowell and take the compliments from your guests, and take em well.You can check out Mike’s strange explanations at the bassist’s official website.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s announces shift to indoor dining, requires reservations

first_imgBeginning Monday, students will have the option to eat inside the Noble Family Dining Hall, dean of academic student services Karen Chambers announced in an email Wednesday.The email said all students with a meal plan will be required to make a 30-minute reservation for lunch Monday through Friday as well as for dinner Sunday through Thursday. Students’ reservations will remain the same for the rest of the semester.“Lunch will start at 11:30 a.m.; the last lunch reservation will begin at 1 p.m.,” Chambers said in the email. “Dinner will start at 5:30 p.m.; the last dinner reservation will begin at 7:30 p.m.”Reservation blocks are available every 15 minutes and are limited to 175 students at lunch and 150 students at dinner.Students will continue to be able to carry out their meals as outdoor dining areas will continue to be open to students if weather permits.Additionally, plexiglass dividers have been installed to allow for social distancing at tables.At this time only students will be able to eat inside the dining hall. All other members of the community are asked to continue to utilize the carryout service.Tags: COVID-19, Saint Mary’s Campus Dining, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Police work to ID man found dead near Veteran’s Memorial Bridge

first_img Next Up Authorities are trying to identify a body found near the county lines of Jefferson and Orange. The Orange County Sheriff’s Office located the body of a white male in the water approximately a quarter mile from the Veteran’s Memorial Bridge.Police said they made the discovery at 11:30 a.m. Friday.Investigators are currently working to positively identify the male.Police said the name would not be released until an identification had been made and family had been properly notified.last_img read more

Elaine Carter

first_img Elaine is preceded in death by her brother Willie Carter III, sister, Stephanie Carter Marshall, sis-in-law Julia Carter and nephew KeithenCarter.She leaves to cherish her memories, two sisters, Diana Antoine and Claudette Carter; four brothers, Earl Carter (Mamie), Nathan Carter,Timothy Carter and Kenneth Carter (Anne), nieces, nephews and host of other family members and friends. Elaine Carter, 67 of Port Arthur, TX was called to her heavenly home on Saturday, August 22, 2020 at her home.She was born March 27, 1953 to the late Willie Carter Jr and Lula Carter Bradford.Elaine resided in San Francisco, CA for 22 years before moving back home in 1998. A graduate of Abraham Lincoln Class of 1971.She was employed with Lowes’ Home Improvement for 19 years.Elaine was a devoted member of Rose of Sharon Baptist Church of Port Arthur, Texas.center_img Funeral service will be at 2 pm Saturday, September 12, 2020 at Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel, 3800 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, TX withvisitation from 12 pm until service time.last_img read more